How to manage snoring and sleep apnea without CPAP, drugs or surgery

stop snoring mouthguard

The answer is to use a Stop Snoring mouthpiece, and though some may not like to admit it, just about everyone will snore on occasions, and millions of us snore on a regular basis and may not even realize it if we sleep alone. If you are a frequent snorer, it doesn’t only affect the quantity of your sleep – it can also have a negative impact on the quality.

More concerning, however, is there are many who don’t just snore, but who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and they are placing strain on their heart, leading to a higher risk of heart attacks and strokes. While associated with one another, snoring does not mean that an individual has sleep apnea and sleep apnea does not always result in snoring. Normal snoring will not interfere with the quality of your sleep like sleep apnea does.

Figures now say that one-fifth of adults have nightly sleep apnea to a greater or lesser degree, which causes repeated stoppages in breathing and a resultant lack of oxygen that affects the brain, heart and rest of the body. These breathing interferences cause the brain to panic and disrupt the deep sleep we need for good health.

Airway problems caused by sleep apnea frequently cause loud snoring and gasping for air. Many people have insomnia, poor sleep and daytime tiredness as a result of unrecognized sleep apnea and it is known to result in serious health issues – particularly diabetic and cardiovascular problems.

Snorers who do not have OSA may feel a sense of relief, but this does not mean that you should leave your snoring untreated. Snoring doesn’t only affect the quality of your own sleep and health – it can also affect the quality of your partner’s sleep and health. It has been known to place a significant strain on relationships, particularly if the snoring partner makes little or no effort to solve it, as is often the case.

When most snorers think of a snoring solution, they still think of the historic CPAP route. Consisting of a mask, tubes and a machine, the thought of wearing CPAP equipment is daunting to many snorers, particularly those who do not have sleep apnea and who are not suffering from any negative effects that often come with snoring. The majority of sleep apnea patients refuse to wear CPAP or rip off the mask while asleep. Studies show that half of all people prescribed CPAP quit within a few months.

Fortunately snorers now have the option of managing their snoring through an easy to use “stop snoring” mouthpiece, called an MAD or mandibular advancement device. It’s very like a sports mouth guard, and once inserted into a user’s mouth, the MAD is designed to hold the user’s lower jaw in a slightly advanced position. This causes the muscles and the tissues in the upper airway to stay open by remaining taut and unobstructed.

This alternative to CPAP is gaining popularity and is sometimes called oral appliance therapy. Oral appliances prevent the tongue and soft tissues in the back of the throat from collapsing. By supporting the jaw in a forward position, the airway stays open during sleep. The NHS in the UK and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine now include oral appliances as a first-line treatment for both snoring, and for treating mild to moderate sleep apnoea. They also state that oral appliances are acceptable for patients who cannot use CPAP or would prefer an oral appliance to using CPAP.

There are a wide range of SleepPro oral appliances available to suit your individual needs, and these range from starter appliances such as Easifit. Sleep Tight or Woman, to the more adjustable Contour appliance. These ‘one size fits all’ SleepPro appliances benefit from a unique method of moulding that adjusts them to fit your mouth comfortably.

Oral appliances that are made specifically to fit your own dental profile, such as the SleepPro Custom, are also available and are NHS approved – not just for effectiveness and ease of use, but also for affordability as others can charge a small fortune for the same thing. It’s also important to look after your oral appliance so as to achieve permanently good results and keep it well-fitting and well maintained.

Treating your snoring or sleep apnea with oral appliance therapy can help you feel like a new person. You will find that your symptoms, and your quality of life, can improve dramatically when you remain committed to your treatment and use it nightly. It is likely that you will sleep better, have more energy and feel sharper throughout the day. You may find that your bed partner gets better sleep, too. After all, don’t forget that your sleep breathing problems affect them also.

John Redfern