“Laugh and the world laughs with you. Snore and you sleep alone…”

Those are the often-quoted words of Anthony Burgess, the novelist and composer, but despite clever sayings like that, and nearly endless jokes about snoring spouses, snoring is literally no laughing matter.

snoring keeps partners awake

Snoring, as we know, is that very annoying sound made by vibrations in the back of the throat or nose by someone who is probably deeply asleep. It is generally more common in men, in people who are overweight, or in those over the age of 50. But anyone can snore, including skinny young women and even babies and children.

Snoring may come and go, such as when the nose is stuffed up because of a cold or a seasonal allergy, and in this particular case it may be a little irritating to someone trying to sleep in the same room as well as to the snorer who may not be sleeping well. It all passes though as soon as they recover from their temporary condition, and generally, there is no harm done.

Chronic snoring, however, and by that I mean the kind that occurs every night and sometimes throughout the night, is often a sign of something much more sinister than the common cold. When the tissues at the back of the throat become so relaxed and loose during sleep that they vibrate loudly and incessantly, they are also blocking the free passage of air in and out of the lungs. Sometimes the tissues collapse completely or the tongue falls back against them and the breathing stops altogether.

It can stay that way for a minute, even more, and when this happens, the blood oxygen level falls and the brain begins to panic – it is suffocating!

The brain has to make a choice between breathing and sleeping and luckily, sleeping usually wins. The brain wakes up, the person may gasp, gurgle or choke, but they are quickly back asleep again and the snoring cycle begins anew. This can happen dozens, even hundreds of times during the night and the sleeper often has no recollection of any of it in the morning. All he or she knows is they are tired even after a full night of “sleep.” This is obstructive sleep apnea or OSA.

It makes sense therefore that those with OSA may be fatigued during the day. That repeated life and death struggle to breathe through the night is not restful and the resulting daytime sleepiness can be dangerous.

In fact, a study presented to the Association of Professional Sleep Societies in June of 2015 revealed that people with sleep apnea are twice as likely to be involved in a workplace accident and 2.5 times more likely to be the driver in an automobile crash than those who do not have the sleep related breathing disorder.

According to the National Sleep Foundation, OSA affects 1 in every 15 people, representing a significant and growing public health concern. Those with sleep apnea are more susceptible to depression, obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure and have been shown to be more likely to die from cancer than those without sleep apnea.

Sometimes in order to determine if someone has temporary snoring from another condition or has potentially perilous obstructive sleep apnea, an overnight sleep study may be done. However if you choke and gasp for breath in the night then your partner is sure to know.

Treatment for OSA can vary but the most common treatments used today are the CPAP machine and the mandibular advancement device.

A CPAP machine, which stands for continuous positive airway pressure, is a computerized blower that supplies air pressure via a tube and face mask to hold the relaxed throat tissues open while the patient sleeps. Unfortunately for numerous reasons including discomfort the rejection levels are high.

A mandibular advancement device, or MAD, is a custom fitted oral device designed to hold the jaw forward at night. By locking the top and bottom teeth together, the lower jaw, and therefore the tongue, cannot slide back and block the throat when the wearer falls asleep.

Habitual snoring signals airway obstruction and has the potential for very serious long term physical and mental health problems such as diabetes, cancer, and major cardiovascular problems as well as cognitive disabilities such as early onset of Alzheimer’s or dementia.

Basically, snoring will ruin your health unless you do something about it.

John Redfern.


Snoring is contributing greatly to a massive increase in World Obesity

World media is focused at the moment on the benefits of adequate amounts of undisturbed sleep, and the health problems this creates. The research, led by scientists from Imperial College London and published in The Lancet, compared body mass index (BMI) among almost 20 million adult men and women from 1975 to 2014.

It found obesity in men has tripled and more than doubled in women.

Obesity and snoring

The world’s newspapers, plus the leading TV stations and Internet News Channels, have all headlined with the story this week that obesity is quite literally a massive growing world problem.

No country is excluded from this. The study, which pooled data from adults in 186 countries, found that the number of obese people worldwide had risen from 105 million in 1975 to 641 million in 2014. This equates to 266 million obese men and 375 million obese women in the world at the end of 2014.

It’s a vicious, ever turning circle. Health research has shown that disturbed nights due to either snoring or sleep apnoea causes late night snacking and as a consequence weight gain – and as a result the increased weight also narrows the throat to cause even worse levels of snoring.

The research also found:

  • More obese men and women now live in China and the USA than in any other country
  • Almost a fifth of the world’s obese adults – 118 million – live in only six high-income English-speaking countries – Australia, Canada, Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, UK, and the US
  • Women in the UK have the third highest BMI in Europe and the 10th highest for men
  • By 2025, the UK is projected to have the highest levels of obese women in Europe (38%), followed by Republic of Ireland (37%) and Malta (34%)

Other statistics from the study include:

  • China has the largest number of obese people in the world with 43.2 million men and 46.4 million women
  • The US has 41.7 million obese men and 46.1 million obese women

In comparison in the UK the study found 6.8 million obese men in 2014, and 7.7 million obese women.

The average adult in the United Kingdom sleeps for 6.8 hours a night, which is below the 7.7 hours people feel they need according to the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH), and the figures according to other sources are almost identical for the North America, Australia, and Europe

This lower sleep level doesn’t sound much but it amounts to losing an entire night’s sleep over the course of a week.

The RSPH, which represents around 6,000 public health specialists, said poor sleep has been undeniably linked to a range of conditions including:

  • cancer
  • diabetes
  • heart attack
  • depression

It has called on the Government to introduce national sleep guidance and both instigate and support policies that reduce and control sleep disorders.

“We do need to wake up to the benefits of sleep – there is a wealth of evidence that lack of sleep is damaging the public’s health,” said Shirley Cramer chief executive of RSPH.

She added: “Efforts to combat this shortfall could be as critical to optimising our health and wellbeing as maintaining an active lifestyle or having a healthy diet.”

Yet again this is conclusive evidence that snoring, sleep apnoea, and other sleep disorders damage your health. You need to do something about it yourself if the Government won’t act on your behalf.

John Redfern

 


Is my snoring sleep apnoea?

Ask yourself this important question before it’s too late.

Is my snoring sleep apnoea?

Everyone who has sleep apnoea snores, but not everyone who snores has sleep apnoea. So how do we know which of the two problems we have?

sleep Aponea

Couple sleeping and spooning in bed in bedroom at home

Sleep apnoea can affect anyone; man or woman, young or old. It seems to run in some families, suggesting a possible genetic basis. People most likely to have or develop sleep apnoea include those who snore loudly, are overweight, have high blood pressure, and may have some physical abnormality in the nose, throat, or other parts of the upper airway.

Sleep apnoea is a health condition involving the collapse of the upper airway while an individual sleeps, leading to reduced airflow to the lungs. This often causes the individual to wake up at frequent intervals during the night as a reflex response to the resultant insufficient oxygen supply.

The key symptom of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is very clear. Breathing pauses a number of times during sleep and these are called apneic events. There may be as many as 20 to 30 or more of these events per hour and between them you will snore.

OSA may also cause you to have a choking sensation and when your breathing restarts, you may make a loud snort or gasp. These frequent breaks in deep, restorative sleep often result in headaches and excessive daytime sleepiness and it has been proved that this constant interruption of oxygen supply to the brain can often have deadly results. Other symptoms include dry mouth or sore throat and problems paying attention.

This common sleep disorder is characterised by these repeated interruptions in breathing throughout the sleep cycle. Chronic sleep or respiratory conditions can have devastating effects if not treated or diagnosed, and it is estimated that 80% of patients with OSA remain undiagnosed, which can impact long-term health by turning sleep or breathing into a burden with the following being the key problems that result.

  • High blood pressure
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Heart disease/heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Driving and work-related accidents

Sleep apnea affects more than just sleep; it can affect the relationships, productivity and even overall health of those suffering from this condition. Even worse, rather than solving the problem, sleeping with the usually prescribed continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) bulky equipment can sometimes make it even harder to get a good night’s rest. An incredibly high percentage of those using CPAP equipment simply stop doing so and therefore receive no treatment and are described as ‘CPAP intolerant’.

Now, in many cases other than those which are extreme, difficulty in wearing the CPAP facemask through which oxygen is pumped all night, is no longer a problem as an efficient oral appliance will prevent most of the problem and in doing so, protect your short and long term health.

Recently, both the NHS and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) approved dental appliances as a first line of treatment for snoring and mild to moderate sleep apnoea and for patients with severe sleep apnoea who cannot tolerate CPAP.

After extensive research, the appliance recommended by the NHS in the UK above all others, was the SleepPro Custom, which moves the lower jaw forward, into a comfortable position, and ensures there is no obstruction of your airway. An ideal solution for snoring and related issues, the Custom can improve sleep quality and is a medically approved alternative to CPAP therapy and the awkward and uncomfortable CPAP equipment.

The SleepPro Custom is made from a fully customized dental impression that you would create with the special kit provided, and as a consequence is comfortable as well as effective. Once we receive your impressions our UK Dental laboratories will custom make the oral appliance to fit you perfectly. It is many times cheaper than similarly made appliances that are supplied by a Dentist, and it is made in exactly the same way.

John Redfern

 


How to Stop Snoring

How to sleep silently and safely with SleepPro is now becoming a very well-known fact. After receiving really positive approval this week in the National Press, ITV also featured the benefits of the SleepPro Chin Strap and how easy it is to wear to prevent open-mouthed snoring.

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In the Health section of the morning’s topical news programme ‘Lorraine’, hosted by Lorraine Kelly, the well-known resident Health expert Dr. Hillary actually wore and demonstrated the product live on air.

John Redfern


New research proves that snoring speeds cancer development

A new European sleep apnoea study has found that snoring promotes cancer development because it limits oxygen intake. This might worsen outcomes for cancer patients. It reveals that intermittent hypoxia, which is a common side effect of sleep apnoea, promotes cancer development by promoting blood vessel growth within tumours.

stop snoring help beat cancer

Lead researcher Dr. Antoni Vilaseca, of the Hospital Clinic De Barcelona in Spain, and his colleagues, recently presented their findings at the European Association of Urology (EAU) Congress in Munich, Germany.

Numerous previous studies have linked bad sleep to poor cancer outcomes, and this latest study reveals that hypoxia may be the reason why it happens. Researchers in Spain explain that hypoxia, which is just one of the many consequences of sleep apnoea, happens when body tissues or organs don’t get enough oxygen.

A 2012 study reported by Medical News Today, for example, suggests that sleep apnea increases the risk of cancer death. Last year, MNT also reported on a study linking heavy snoring and sleep apnoea to earlier cognitive decline including Alzheimer’s and dementia – both being advanced by 5 to 10 years because of it.

Abnormal breathing patterns during sleep, like sleep apnoea and heavy snoring, are more common as we age. According to published figures, such breathing problems affect around 52% of elderly men and 26% of elderly women.

Lead researcher Antoni Vilaseca of Hospital Clínic De Barcelona said that the latest findings suggest obstructive sleep apnea promotes cancer development by increasing blood flow in tumours. Dr. Vilaseca and his colleagues recently presented their findings at the European Association of Urology (EAU) Congress in Munich, Germany.

“Patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea usually suffer from intermittent hypoxia at night. This work shows that intermittent hypoxia has the potential to promote the formation of blood vessels within tumours, meaning that the tumours have access to more nutrients,” Vilaseca said in a news release.

Sleep apnoea is a disorder in which a person has shallow breaths or one or more pauses in breathing during sleep. Such pauses can last from seconds up to a few minutes, and they can happen as many as 30 times in an hour. Obstructive sleep apnoea is the most common form of the condition, where the airway becomes blocked or collapses during sleep. It can easily be prevented, by the wearing of a simple mouthpiece at night, but the majority of cases go undiagnosed and untreated. Snorers and their partners continue to ignore it and even consider it harmless.

Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) affects millions of people worldwide and is an ever-increasing problem, mostly due to the increase of some of the main lifestyle factors that cause it. It is known to affect more than 18 million Americans in the US, with millions more not having treatment. Risk factors for the disorder include a small upper airway, smoking, alcohol use, being overweight and having a large neck, small jaw or a large overbite.

Approximately 5% of the UK adult population is known to have OSA, and the figures for Australia are even higher. Some of the high-population emergent nations have even bigger levels. Figures published this week stated that the level in India was assessed at 15%, and that for China higher still. Asia News alarmingly reported that as many as 30% of the population had OSA.

“Although this is an experimental study, it is remarkable, because it demonstrates the influence of oxygen deficiency on the growth of renal cell carcinoma tissue. Increased oxygenation of the blood may be the underlying mechanism why not smoking or giving up smoking, regular sport activity, reducing the body mass index and other lifestyle changes that increase tissue oxygenation have a supportive beneficial effect on better outcomes in renal cell cancer as well as other tumour types,” Arnulf Stenzl, Chair of the EAU Congress Committee, said in a statement.

Whatever the figures are – action is required at every level including Government controlled Health Services. Oral appliances similar to a sports mouthguard, when worn at night, have been proved by the NHS Researchers in Britain to prevent and control the problem. These appliances are inexpensive and easily available with no prescription required – but the majority of snorers ignore the problem until it’s too late.

John Redfern


Does your partner snore loudly and keep you awake?

Comedians joke about snoring, but snoring can be deadly serious. Snoring can be much more than a nuisance – it can keep you awake, get on your nerves and drive your partner into denial about how loud they are doing it when you confront them the following morning. So if your partner doesn’t believe he snores, you will have to persuade him that he does.

snoring and your partner

Your partner’s snoring could be a serious health and quality-of-life issue for both of you. If your partner’s snoring undermines your sleep then your brain and body are doing less well. With poorer sleep your work life, friendships, memory, driving, and everything else you do in life may suffer. The snoring can even become a threat to your relationship.

In fact, it’s recorded as the third biggest reason for divorce and forces many couples to sleep apart even when still together. However you can play an important part not only in keeping the relationship together, but also in making significant improvements to the health of you both by avoiding major health problems now, and more so later in life. Therefore it’s actually very important to monitor your partner’s snoring and keep your ears peeled for particular sounds and changes.

Firstly, although snoring isn’t natural, it’s very common as we all know, and steps should be taken to resolve it. The cause is a simple one. Snoring mostly occurs when the soft tissue part of our upper airway vibrates. This is called the uvula or soft palate and it normally happens when someone inhales during sleep. Although it is most common in middle-aged men, many women, and younger people suffer from the problem too.

Snoring is most commonly caused by someone being overweight, smoking, drinking alcohol and nasal obstruction (from flu or allergies etc.) – all of which are very important health issues in themselves. The cause of the snoring should be addressed in it’s own right – a quiet night’s sleep is an added bonus. Although the snorer is asleep, the person isn’t actually sleeping well and this can result in fatigue and headaches.

After years of snoring, it is possible for it to develop into Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA). Signs of OSA include very loud snoring with periods when the person stops breathing for up to 10 seconds before gasping and choking. This could happen many times throughout the night. At this time oxygen is unable to reach the brain, which alerts the person and they wake briefly, but they won’t remember doing so.

OSA should always be addressed urgently as it can develop into more serious conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and heart issues. It has now been prove to be a significant cause of diabetes type 2, and also to advance cognitive problems such as Alzheimer’s or dementia by anything from five to ten years.

Women suffer too and they are more likely to snore after the menopause as a drop in their oestrogen and progesterone levels leave them less protected against lifestyle changes. They are more likely than men to suffer from problems such as depression, insomnia and headaches due to snoring.

To overcome the problem of snoring and prevent it’s development then obviously certain changes in lifestyle will be helpful, but these are often slow and difficult targets to attain – and sometimes far from popular so people give up. However if you do take active steps to improve your lifestyle then you will feel the benefits in other consequential areas.

To prevent snoring and OSA, there are products available with virtually 100% success rates and these are both recommended and approved by the NHS without the need for a prescription or making visits to Hospitals with designated Sleep Centres.

A simple, comfortable oral appliance, similar to a sports gum shield can be worn during sleep to eliminate the problem. They are unobtrusive and comfortable to wear as they mould easily in seconds to fit the shape of your mouth. They’re also inexpensive and start at under £40 whether it’s just for snoring, or for the more dangerous version called sleep apnoea.

What price a healthy longer life?

John Redfern


It’s easy – stop snoring and start to lose weight

Do you find it impossible to lose those unwanted pounds even though you’ve tried to cut down on fatty foods and exercise regularly? According to a new book reviewed at length in The Daily Mail, the key to successful weight loss lies not so much with what you’re eating and how much exercise you’re taking – but with your sleeping habits.

Stop Snoring lose weight

In ‘The Duvet Diet – Sleep Yourself Slim’, health journalist Jane Worthington looks at a host of new research that suggests broken nights significantly disrupt our hormones and metabolism, leaving us much more prone to overeating and weight gain.

But once you get into healthy sleep habits, she says, you’ll find it much easier to control your appetite and lose weight. She quotes a recent study of more than 6,000 people carried out at Columbia University, America.

Stopping snoring will obviously help you and your partner to sleep better and this research has now clearly proved that this makes weight loss much easier. Scientists have found that sleep deprivation causes excessive hunger, which may lead to an increased BMI and other health problems. Sleep better and without even trying you’ll eat less because you’ll feel less hungry and you’ll not be prone to snacking.

When it comes to getting more sleep, Jane Worthington suggests that simply improving your bedtime routine and eating habits can work wonders – though if you snore, it is vital you address this problem first of all.

Snoring is a major cause of sleeplessness. If you gasp for breath when you’re sleeping, it can mean that you could be waking up as much as 100 times an hour without realising.

Severe snoring can be due to a condition called sleep apnoea, when you struggle to get air into your lungs because something is restricting the airway. This restriction often comes from the weight of fat around the neck – a problem that becomes more prevalent with age as muscle tone in the neck decreases. People with short wide necks are most prone to snoring.

Men are also more susceptible as they tend to accumulate more fat around the neck as they age and have narrower air pipes than women but a simple stop snoring mouthpiece designed for either sex will move the bottom jaw forward, keep the airway open, and prevent snoring.

Another new study looked at changes in body chemistry when deprived of sleep, and concluded that sleep deprivation causes excessive hunger. The lead author states that his findings add to the growing evidence of the dramatic effects on weight of snoring, sleep apnoea and sleep deprivation.

Losing weight is never easy, and harder for some people than others, but it has been proved that losing massive amounts of weight isn’t necessary to improve health. Shedding just 5% of body weight has been found to produce the biggest health benefits.

Researchers say this relatively small weight loss markedly lowers people’s risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease, as well as improving metabolic function in liver, fat and muscle tissue. They suggest it makes more sense for doctors to give patients this target to aim for than follow standard advice recommending they aim to lose up to 10% – a much higher target that may be counterproductive and even deter them.

Those patients who managed to lose 5% of their body weight experienced improvements to the secretion of insulin as well as insulin sensitivity, lowering their risk of type 2 diabetes. Future research may test whether a 5% weight loss would be beneficial to people already diagnosed with diabetes.

Commenting on the findings the British Heart Foundation says: “This study is good news for people who struggle with their weight as it suggests that even losing a small amount of weight can have a positive impact on health.

“As little as 5% weight loss resulted in improved blood pressure and lower levels of blood fats and blood sugar, which are all risk factors for heart disease. Losing more weight further improved heart health but setting realistic goals such as 5% is a good way to maintain healthy weight loss”.

When it comes to reducing your risk of cardiovascular disease, lifestyle changes do not just apply to losing weight. Giving up smoking, preventing snoring or sleep apnoea, decreasing your alcohol intake and being more physically active all help reduce our risk of developing heart disease.

Stopping snoring will kick-start the weight loss automatically without you embarking on major forced changes in your eating habits or a ‘duvet diet’.

John Redfern


Why Sleep Problems often get ignored

 

Sleeplessness has a long and tortured history. A 15th-century Italian lawyer named Hippolytus de Marsiliis is said to have first documented sleep deprivation as a way to punish prisoners. To add to that this, make a note that he is the same man credited with confirming the effectiveness of slow-drip water torture. He was merely making formal what humans had known for centuries; not getting enough sleep is painful.

Mental health concept in playful style with egg characters

Mental health concept in playful style with egg characters

Today, the problem of too little sleep, and the quest for more of it, is as acute as ever. Over a quarter of the people interviewed in a new consumer survey of adults said they had trouble falling asleep or staying asleep most nights, and two thirds of them struggled with sleep at least once a week. For those in charge of machinery, or who are professional drivers, this lack of sleep can be a serious problem.

Tiredness at the wheel is just one major problem that results from lack of sleep and nodding off at the wheel isn’t just frightening – it can be fatal. Just think – at 55 mph you cover the length of a football field in 5 seconds. In fact, about one-fifth of fatal car crashes involve a drowsy driver, according to a 2014 study in which specially trained investigators analysed all the car crashes from 2009 to 2013.

A good night’s sleep can require everything from the practical, such as a comfortable pillow, to having calm and peace of mind. On top of this, the modern marketplace has exploded with supposed solutions for people who can’t sleep due to them or their partner snoring, but few of them are tested or approved.

For example, Americans spent an estimated $41 billion on sleep aids and remedies in 2015, and that’s expected to grow to $52 billion by 2020, according to an analysis by BCC Research. The main problem is that certain solutions don’t work as well as claimed – and that’s if they work at all.

Make sure they are either NHS or FDA approved and if possible they have evidence of authentic published medical testing. After all your health is what’s at stake so it’s not about buying cheap and saving small amounts of money. The word cheap means exactly what it says, and there are very good reasons for using it.

Millions of us have a sleep disorder such as snoring, sleep apnoea, or chronic insomnia and this can bring persistent difficulty sleeping and subsequent trouble functioning during the day – and that includes both men and women. The vast majority don’t get properly diagnosed or treated, according to research published in the journal Sleep Medicine.

Some people may be unaware of sleep interruptions, perhaps because they live alone, and often patients don’t bring their sleep to the attention of doctors because they don’t think it’s a medical problem or that the doctor won’t be able to help – and that may be exactly right.

Past surveys have shown that medical schools have formally devoted, on average, less than 2 hours overall to sleep medicine, and doctors might not routinely discuss sleep problems during reviews and visits. A study in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine found that only 25% of primary care providers asked new patients about insomnia or other sleep issues, although many had signs of problems. Doctors might also find it hard to pinpoint which of the many sleep disorders is the culprit because symptoms may be unclear, and other illnesses and habits may also affect rest.

However if the problem is snoring or sleep apnoea, then the signs are very obvious, and prevention or control is of either is simple. On its own, snoring isn’t necessarily a serious concern. Almost everyone with sleep apnoea snores, but not everyone who snores has sleep apnoea.

The difference is that vibrations of the soft tissues of the upper airway produce snoring, and sleep apnoea occurs when the airway collapses and air cannot get into the lungs, interrupting sleep 30 to 60 times per hour.

There are lots of statistics to back this up. In the UK while 40% of men and almost 25% of women snore habitually, approximately 9% of men and 5% of women have sleep apnoea – but many more cases are unreported or undiagnosed. In the USA 12% of men and 8% of women are being treated for sleep apnoea. The figures are reported to be even higher in Australia but men still suffer more than women from this far-reaching condition.

Snoring and sleep apnoea are both easily treated with either a simple mouthpiece that brings the lower jaw forward while sleeping, and consequently opens the airway, or if you snore open-mouthed, by using an elasticated Chin Strap that closes the mouth and prevents you from snoring. Sometimes a combination of the two works even better for some people.

There’s a wide choice of medically approved oral appliances available – and as a consequence they don’t need a prescription. They are all good value, and easily affordable, and they can improve your life and health enormously.

John Redfern


Snoring with your mouth open damages your teeth as well as your health

 

For those of us who sleep with our mouth open and ‘catch flies’ while we sleep, there’s more bad news because scientists have found that sleeping with the mouth open can be as damaging to teeth as having a can of fizzy drink just before going to bed. This is because breathing through the mouth dries it out – removing the protective effect of saliva, which has a natural ability to kill the bacteria in the mouth that produce acid. As the acid levels rise through the night, tooth erosion and decay can begin. Having cleaned your teeth before retiring will have been a waste of time.

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The researchers believe the findings help to explain observations of many dentists who say that people who sleep open-mouthed have higher rates of tooth decay. Men are most likely to be affected, as research has shown nearly a third breathe through their mouths while asleep, compared to just five per cent of women.

Tooth decay in mouth sleepers is often worse at the back and this is because the back of the mouth tends to get drier than the front. Patients most at risk are those with either asthma or obstructive sleep apnoea. They are the ones more likely to breathe through their mouth at night – and in many cases snore loudly.

This can easily be avoided by wearing a simple chin support strap device at night when you go to bed. As one of the industry’s most cost-effective and widely used anti-snoring devices on the market today, a chin strap is really easy to fit, wear and maintain.

If you are new to products that successfully reduce and or stop snoring or you’re simply looking for a different approach then a chin strap is an absolute must to try. They have a long record of being successful, reliable and very safe – and they’re incredibly inexpensive.

This was emphasised in the national newspapers this week, as well as being featured on ITV in one of the regular daily news slots for health, where the SleepPro Chin Strap was featured and recommended – see the Video.

Clinical trials also support the facts about chin straps, and to put it very simply, they work, but it doesn’t end there.

They can also assist closed mouthed snorers who suffer from nasal blockage and/or mild sleep apnea because, when used in combination with a Mandibular Advancement Devices (MAD), often just called a mouthpiece, they can help to reinforce the tongue and muscle stability needed for peaceful sleep provided by your MAD. The idea behind a chin strap is very simple and that’s why they are so effective. They work by holding the jaw firmly in place… and that’s it! Buy the two together and save money.

This simplicity helps in two ways:

Firstly it reduces the chance of your tongue falling back into the throat, where it will block airways, and secondly it reduces the risk of loose-tissue, which is centred on the neck and jaw from vibrating, as it is held in place.

These proven approaches to reduce and or stop snoring are accepted worldwide as simple, inexpensive, effective ways to secure noise free sleep.

They are comfortable to wear as one single elasticated strap fits easily under the chin and then divides and extends around the back and top of the head for a snug, comfortable fit, for which the tension can be adjusted.

As a consequence of this flexibility – one size fits all – and with the SleepPro Chin Support Strap on you’ll hardly notice it but it will prevent you from snoring, help you to sleep peacefully, and as a result you’ll wake refreshed.

 

John Redfern

 


Make it your New Year Resolution to sleep better

As we embrace the New Year and set our personal goals for 2016, it’s important to make sleep a priority. Getting enough sleep and ensuring good quality sleep is a key to maintaining good physical and mental health.

Depositphotos_9063206_sleeppro

So before committing yourself to that expensive Gym membership, getting up early to exercise each day, or starting your next diet, make sure sleep figures in your plans for the coming year. This time of the year, many of us are making New Year’s resolutions. What do we plan to give up that we indulged in too often throughout the year? What are we going to take up that we wished we had made time for this year? As we make these plans, it’s important to make sleep a priority rather than something that can be traded off, to make space in our schedule for other activities.

Very few of us sleep well, and some of those who think they do should perhaps ask their long-suffering partner if that’s the case or not.

Sleep disorders affect millions of people in every country of the world and very few of them do anything about it, and as a result of that suffer serious consequences as far as their health is concerned – something that can easily be remedied. Adequate, restful sleep is necessary, and in fact vital for both physical and mental well-being. Recommendations from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine are that adults of working age should get at least seven hours undisturbed sleep each night – but not more than nine.

Hundreds of studies have shown that sleep is essential for the normal functioning of the immune system, the endocrine system and the central nervous system. In addition, as we all know and have always stressed, adequate sleep is crucial for learning in our children, and continues to be so even when they are young adults. It’s no different when we reach that adult age ourselves. After all why should it change because we’re older; it’s just as important then, if not more so.

Numerous studies continually show that interrupted sleep not only gives rise to daytime fatigue and weight gain, but may also be associated with very serious life-threatening conditions such as hypertension, heart disease, diabetes and even early onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Some studies even link it to various forms of cancer with an associated earlier death.

Sleep disorders are common but rarely recognised as health problems, and are diagnosed even less often. There are actually 88 different types of sleep disorders and their treatments have advanced significantly in recent years.

Obstructive sleep apnoea, signified by heavy snoring, interrupted breathing, and gasping for breath, is by far the most common sleep disorder encountered, affecting more than hundreds of millions of us worldwide. Research has shown that for critically advanced cases that treatment with a positive airway pressure device leads to reduction in blood pressure and lowers risk in a multitude of areas. A recent Johns Hopkins study from the USA reported that, if left untreated, sleep apnoea could increase glucose levels in the body, leading to insulin-resistant diabetes. It also affects all your cardiovascular functions and strokes can be a result of the neglect. Using an oral appliance will control it and prevent it reaching that serious stage.

Patients with sleep apnoea often experience excessive daytime sleepiness, unrefreshing sleep, snoring, frequent night-time urination, ankle swelling, headaches and memory problems. Treatment options medically approved oral appliances, surgery of various kinds and devices like CPAP for the very worst sufferers. Mouthpieces of course are easiest and are highly effective, plus they’re easily available and with no prescription required.

The important thing is to act – and to do it now before it’s too late or it will be just forgotten as often happens, until your health problems eventually remind you.

Lets face it – it’s not sensible to allow that critical oxygen supply to be cut off from your brain – and heavy snoring and sleep apnoea do just that. If you allow it to continue you’re in effect allowing yourself to be strangled and could be damaging your health forever. An oral appliance will prevent that and may even reverse some of the damage already done.

Sleep well in 2016 with SleepPro
Have a Happy and Healthy New Year

John Redfern